EDFish

Selected tag(s): small-scale fisheries

Women in Fisheries Q&A: how women strengthen and support the fishing sector

Environmental Defense Fund recently invited Julie Kuchepatov, founder of Seafood and Gender Equality, to have a conversation with three EDF team members on the role of women in small-scale fisheries in their respective countries. Julie spoke with Onesya Damayanti, Community Outreach Specialist, Indonesia; Layla Osman, Small-Scale Fisheries Manager, Humboldt Current; and Ana Suarez, Senior Specialist for Capacity Development, Partnerships and Global Inclusion, Mexico. In this conversation, Julie and our team explore the important roles of women in coastal communities around the world — and how women’s work in fisheries adds value in countless ways. Read More »

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Fish: the missing ingredient in addressing global malnutrition

One of the things I focus on in my role as a climate scientist is understanding the impact of climate change on ocean fish populations as well as better fishery management practices to help ensure the continued delivery of seafood and livelihoods for millions of people around the world. Critically, the world is confronted with the challenge of increasing access to healthy food for a population that is expected to reach 10 billion by 2050. This summer, as people around the world take to the beaches and coastlines for some relaxation and enjoyment, it’s valuable to remember the major role oceans have in supporting human sustenance. Read More »

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Fishing for Resilience: a video series to introduce you to climate-resilient fisheries

Today, we’re introducing readers to the concept of climate resilience in marine fisheries through a new, three-part video series called “Fishing for Resilience.” As Environmental Defense Fund’s Senior Director for Resilient Fisheries, I played a central role in the creation of this short series — even “starring” in the videos as narrator.

Producing and narrating these videos was a bit of a personal journey for me, and not just because I had to listen to my own voice. It’s because I tried to bring this concept home, and found myself asking what climate change means to friends and family that ply the seas, what it means for my community, and what it means for the wildlife and ecosystems that I hold dear. That got me right into thinking about how to help the people, wildlife and broader ocean ecosystems that I care about in practical ways.

Read More »

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Smart cameras can play a fundamental role in sustaining small-scale fisheries

By Christopher Cusack and Harlisa

Small-scale fisheries are much bigger than you may have thought. They are fundamental to the food security, nutrition and economic well-being of hundreds of millions of people worldwide (the FAO estimates that 200 million people worldwide rely on small-scale fisheries for some part of their livelihood). Small-scale does not equal small catch. Read More »

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Help develop a new digital hub to support small-scale fisheries

By EDF, the secretariat for SSF Hub partners

Small-scale fisheries are worth talking about now more than ever. Millions of people around the world depend on small-scale fisheries for their health, livelihoods and culture. There are many resources, tools and people working to support sustainable small-scale fisheries, or SSF, but it can be hard to find these tools or to make connections between the people working toward this goal. That’s why a new digital tool — called the Small-Scale Fisheries Resource and Collaboration Hub, or SSF Hub — is being created. Read More »

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How knowledge-sharing will improve multispecies fisheries

In many fisheries, many species are caught at the same time. These are called multispecies fisheries, and the fact that they catch many species together, with the same gears, means that the different species are caught at the same rate. The trouble is, some species are productive enough to withstand high catches while others are not. So as a result, the low-productivity species get fished out, reducing overall yield, markets for diverse species and economic and ecological resilience — resulting in serial depletion. While many single-species fisheries are becoming more sustainable thanks to science-based management strategies, multispecies fisheries often face greater sustainability challenges, and these challenges will grow in the face of climate change. Read More »

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