New Study in the Journal Nature Describes the Effectiveness and promise of Community-Based Fishery Management

Kate Bonzon, EDF Director of Design Advisory Services

Kate Bonzon, EDF Director of Design Advisory Services

A new study released this week in the journal Nature describes the effectiveness and promise of community-based fishery management.  Among others, the study highlights a catch share in Chile that has 20,000 participants and covers more than 1,500 square miles “making it one of the most successful abalone* fisheries in the world.”  The kind of catch share that covers this fishery is called a territorial use rights for fishing or TURF, an area-based management program that assigns a specific area to an individual, group or community.

*The Chilean system manages loco, a valuable sea snail, commonly called “false abalone” due to its appearance and taste.

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One Comment

  1. Stephanie Rousso
    Posted January 8, 2011 at 11:43 am | Permalink

    Can you please send me the full citation of this article? Or better yet, can you all post a copy of the article on the EDF website for download? I am a former wildife ecologist and now a biology professor in Mexico. My biology students this semester will be learning about sustainable fisheries.