Energy Exchange

Energy efficiency goldmine hiding in plain sight in half a million NYC apartments

By Rory Christian and Ferit Ucar

Replacing regular light bulbs with compact fluorescent or LED lamps and upgrading to energy efficient appliances are approaches anyone can take to use less electricity and lower greenhouse gas emissions. And significant new opportunities to save energy are becoming available to New Yorkers thanks to Reforming the Energy Vision (REV), the state’s initiative to transform the way electricity is generated, moved, and used. But, for 20 percent of New Yorkers who don’t receive an electric bill from their utility, these benefits are not an option. Without properly metering these apartments, New York will miss out on opportunities to make significant energy reductions and risk falling behind in achieving its ambitious environmental goals.

Read More »

Also posted in New York / Read 2 Responses

New study offers invaluable insights about how to engage utility customers on energy efficient behaviors

When given the choice, more people are choosing to use renewable energy and most are making an effort to be efficient in saving electricity. Increasingly, affordable technologies and the growing availability of smart meter data are making it easier for customers to make a range of unprecedented energy choices. The question is, are these innovations reaching all energy customers? Even the most environmentally conscientious or tech-savvy person needs some help in identifying the best opportunities and support to make these choices a better fit with their lifestyles and long-term goals.

New insights

Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative’s (SECC) newest research offers invaluable insights about making that relationship work. The study, Consumer Values: Moving the Needle on Engagement, reveals the needs and goals of the “selectively engaged” energy consumers, which according to the SECC, comprise about 40 of electricity consumers in the United States that are generally interested but only engage sporadically in energy related behavior. The study also delves into why customers adopt energy efficient technologies and behaviors in the long run and what barriers keep them from doing so, and offers solutions for energy providers and their partners to consider.

Read More »

Posted in Clean Energy / Tagged | Comments are closed

New report highlights potential for energy storage in North Carolina

North Carolina recently took another key step in its push for a clean energy future with the publication of a long-awaited study on the opportunities, challenges and value of energy storage for the state. The report, which was mandated under the 2017 Competitive Energy Solutions Act (House Bill 589), is the culmination of a year-long research effort led by a multidisciplinary team of researchers from North Carolina State University in partnership with the North Carolina Policy Collaboratory.

The report finds that North Carolina is at a critical juncture in its clean energy future, with energy storage poised to play a key role. However, in order to develop market opportunities for storage and ensure its full benefits are realized, policymakers must take key steps to wisely accelerate the adoption of energy storage in North Carolina.

Read More »

Also posted in Energy Storage, North Carolina / Tagged | Comments are closed

Without the right policies, energy storage could increase emissions

In December, the six major Independent Systems Operators (ISO’s) across the country filed their plans for creating new market rules and opportunities for energy storage. While the rules will take at least a year to go into effect and the plans are just an initial step, a recent study suggests that this effort may add up to 50,000 megawatts (MW) of storage nationwide in the next decade.

At the same time, many states – like California, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York – are recognizing the potential value of energy storage and are starting to integrate it as a key component of their plans to meet climate and renewable energy goals.

Combined with falling capital costs, these trends suggest a lot of new energy storage in the pipeline. This presents both opportunities and challenges for states looking to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More »

Also posted in Energy Storage, Renewable Energy / Tagged , | Comments are closed

Overheating in New York City apartments leads tenants to throw money out the window

Is your apartment so overheated in the winter that you need to leave your window open to feel comfortable?

If that’s the case, you’re likely living in one of the many buildings in New York City lacking modern boiler controls which include indoor temperature sensors.

Unlike single family homes, where indoor thermostats which control the heating system are the norm, many New York City multifamily buildings lack these temperature sensors in individual apartments and offices. This, combined with radiators which can’t be regulated or even turned off, exacerbates the problem and leaves occupants with no control over the amount of heat entering their premises.

Read More »

Also posted in New York, New York REV / Comments are closed

Why clean energy investments should be part of your risk management strategy

By Jake Hiller

There’s a new way to approach energy risks that should interest business leaders who navigate today’s changing economy.

Is your corporate risk management strategy considering these three realities, and how to respond?

1. Energy prices are volatile and hard to predict

Energy prices fluctuate so knowing when to lock in the best price, and for how long, is a perennial challenge for businesses. Unless, that is, you consider signing a long-term Power Purchase Agreement with an energy provider that specializes in predictable renewable energy – or install your own clean energy infrastructure.

Read More »

Posted in Clean Energy / Comments are closed