Selected category: Clean Power Plan

Clean Jobs Legislation Maintains Momentum in Illinois

https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregondot/3049873452/in/photolist-PNtRR-a8bb4G-5FVki8-5Dr6mn-e56Sft-5Dvp83-7xGorg-9HajEF-5FZA45-5Dr5AM-aDnUMq-baP3Vr-9Hajwk-9Hdde3-9HddDQ-9duVAZ-azxqwi-5vWdqV-9HajMr-9HajAr-7F1KLB-hAP1e5-89gXDE-5Dvp4C-5BKeyv-7Pm1of-9duWjg-6mQ4Kx-2x6mJ1-afLB6B-9HddaE-9HajnK-9BV2oD-89vACi-a3XVDW-aS6Gwz-aHGbjv-6AQk5p-aS6GyX-9Hddo1-aDoWZu-bxPEVP-9HddMu-bjUNjL-auFcC7-auFd2y-9vatMw-9vaudW-9vavdq-9v7uozAt the start of the 2015 Illinois legislative session, a diverse coalition came together to introduce and support the Illinois Clean Jobs bill – legislation which would strengthen Illinois’ energy efficiency policies, as well as update and extend the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The bill would also create a market-based strategy to meet new federal carbon regulations to limit carbon emissions from existing power plants, otherwise known as the Clean Power Plan (CPP).

So now that the regular legislative session has ended, where does the Clean Jobs bill stand?

A victory for the little guy

Initially, the Clean Jobs bill was far from the energy legislation spotlight. Two deep-pocketed companies also introduced bills. Exelon proposed a bailout for three of its uneconomic nuclear reactors. And Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) wanted to restructure its rates to ensure a profit because efficiency and clean energy had reduced the demand for power.

Most political observers felt Exelon and ComEd – which employ teams of lobbyists and enjoy substantial political clout – would quickly obtain what they asked for. Yet neither went anywhere, and it was actually the Clean Jobs legislation that obtained more co-sponsors than the Exelon and ComEd bills – combined. Read More »

Also posted in Clean Energy, Energy Efficiency, Illinois, Renewable Energy| Comments are closed

Texas Leaders Defy All Logic, Side with Sen. McConnell on “Just Say No” to EPA Campaign

pinwheel-pixabayGovernor Greg Abbott and Texas Senators John Cornyn and Ted Cruz recently met in a meeting with Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell to discuss how they could sabotage the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed (CPP). The CPP would place the nation’s first-ever limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants – the rules for which are expected to be finalized this summer.

The reason for the meeting is simple: Sen. McConnell is currently touting a “just say no” approach to EPA’s regulations, advocating states refuse to create a compliance plan, which is clearly to protect his coal-producing state. He also supports legislation to let states opt-out of the pollution reduction program. After the closed-door meeting, Governor Abbott announced he is siding with the Senator from Kentucky on the CPP.

What the press release didn’t say: By aligning himself with Sen. McConnell, Governor Abbott is hurting Texas. Read More »

Also posted in Air Quality, Clean Energy, Natural Gas, Renewable Energy, Texas| Comments are closed

Is 15% of the Global Clean Energy Market Good Enough?

How does 15 percent measure up?https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/7556615906/

If you’re talking about a baseball batting average, 15 percent puts you on the first fast and joyless train to Mudville. If you’re talking about return on savings with today’s interest rates, 15 percent has you laughing all the way to the bank.

If, however, you’re talking about America’s share of a $1.3 trillion global clean energy market, as Advanced Energy Economy recently reported, that 15-percent figure, while not too shabby, merits further consideration about how we got here – and where we should be heading.

Advanced energy market grew a whopping 14% 

Sure, the “advanced energy market” is a broad term, but that’s because it’s a broad market.

Read More »

Also posted in Clean Energy| Tagged | Read 2 Responses

A Promise to Our Children to Save Water in Texas

Source: flickr/carolee

Source: flickr/carolee

Earlier this week, I testified at a hearing of the Texas House Committee on Environmental Regulation, specifically on how Texas will respond to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) proposed Clean Power Plan (CPP), the nation’s first-ever limit on carbon pollution from existing power plants. But before I went to the Capitol, my three-year-old daughter asked me where I was going. I told her I was going to work, and she asked me, “Mommy, what are you going to save?” I replied that I was going to save water, and she said, “Good job, Mommy.”

That’s exactly what the CPP could do for Texas: save millions of gallons of water each year by encouraging the state to switch from polluting power sources (like coal plants) to non-polluting sources (such as wind and solar farms) and increase no-water solutions like energy efficiency.

Virtuous cycle

It’s no secret that Texas is currently in the midst of a multi-year drought – yet the vast majority of our electricity comes from sources that contribute to this prolonged drought, namely coal, nuclear, and natural gas. All of these energy sources require copious amounts of water to produce electricity. Read More »

Also posted in Energy-Water Nexus, Texas| Tagged | Read 2 Responses

NERC's Report is Flawed: We Can Reduce Climate Pollution and Ensure Electric Reliability

rp_power-poles-503935_1280-300x199.jpgIf reducing climate pollution from power plants were a football game, the U.S. team would be halfway to the goal line while fans were still singing the national anthem.

That is, we have already gotten about halfway to the expected goals of the Clean Power Plan – before the rule is even final.

The Clean Power Plan is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) historic effort to place the first-ever limits on climate pollution from our country’s existing fleet of fossil fuel-fired power plants. When it’s finalized this summer, it’s expected to call for a 30 percent reduction in carbon emissions compared to 2005 levels — but U.S. power plant emissions have already fallen 15 percent compared to 2005 levels.

That’s because renewable energy, energy efficiency resources, and natural gas generation have been steadily deployed and growing for years. Even conservative estimates forecast continued growth of these resources — which makes last week’s report from the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) seem really strange.

NERC’s report about the Clean Power Plan’s impacts on electric grid reliability makes predictions that starkly contrast from the progress we’re already seeing.

How did this departure from reality happen? Read More »

Also posted in Clean Energy, Energy Efficiency, Natural Gas, Renewable Energy| Tagged | Comments are closed

Electric Reliability and the Clean Power Plan: Perspectives of a Former Regulator

rp_2Wind_Turbines_and_Power_Lines_East_Sussex_England_-_April_2009-300x204.jpgThere is no great disagreement that the U.S. energy system is transforming. With or without additional environmental regulations, like the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed Clean Power Plan, this transition is occurring. Our history and experience have demonstrated that we can weather it without threatening our uniform and non-negotiable commitment to reliability.

But to do that, we need to tap all of the tools at our disposal to ensure a robust, reliable, and integrated energy system that is no longer dependent exclusively upon centralized, fossil fuel generation. Done right, the resulting change can deliver benefits to customers, the economy, the environment, electric companies, innovators, and workers alike.

EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan would place national limits on carbon pollution from existing fossil fuel power plants for the first time ever. In doing so, it would create long-term market signals that will help drive investments in energy efficiency, demand response, and renewable energy for years to come – not only reducing carbon pollution from the power sector to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, but also by putting us on a path to a more reliable and resilient energy system. Read More »

Also posted in Clean Energy| Comments are closed
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