Selected tags: Tier 3

Newly Released Vehicle and Fuel Standards Will Clean Up U.S. Fleet and Improve Texas Air Quality

Source: Green Mountain Energy Cleaner Times

Source: Green Mountain Energy Cleaner Times

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released updated Tier 3 vehicle emissions and fuel standards. The new standards are an update to the successful Tier 2 performance standards, which were finalized in 2000. Like the legacy Tier 2 program, the new Tier 3 standards will look at vehicles and fuels as a combined system to reduce both tailpipe pollution and gasoline sulfur content, improving urban air quality and saving billions of dollars in healthcare costs. Despite Tier 3’s projected benefits, lawmakers, and oil industry groups insist the standards are too costly. Of course, they fail to count the lasting health benefits from Tier 3—which more than outweigh the cost of the program.

The Benefits

The new fuel standards will instantly reduce emissions from every vehicle on the road once they are implemented in 2017, by reducing the amount of sulfur permitted in gasoline to 10 parts per million. Furthermore, the new vehicle tailpipe standards will cut smog-forming emissions by over 20 percent and fine particulate matter by 10 percent by 2030. EPA projects these vital emissions reductions will prevent between 770 and 2,000 premature deaths, 2,200 hospital admissions, and 19,000 asthma attacks annually by 2030, providing approximately $6.7 – $19 billion in annual health benefits. All of these benefits come at the low cost of less than one additional cent per gallon of gasoline, or about $72 per vehicle. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Car Standards, Environmental Protection Agency, Transportation | Tagged | Comments closed

Why Do Latinos Support Action on Climate Change?

Source: Mom's Clean Air Force

Your abuela or your friend’s abuela may not mention “carbon pollution” or “greenhouse gas emissions” much, but don’t let that fool you into thinking Hispanics are not aware of or unconcerned with what is happening to our planet. In fact, polling confirms that Latinos overwhelmingly support action to curb climate change. A recent poll for the Natural Resources Defense Council by Latino Decisions shows that 80 percent of Latino voters somewhat-to-strongly favor Presidential action to fight carbon pollution.

Why? Family values.

The reasons are similar to those held by many interested in protecting the planet for future generations. The poll proves that Latinos are concerned about air quality, health effects of a worsening environment and teaching a cultural legacy of environmental stewardship and conservation. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Car Standards, Climate Change, Environment, GHGs, Renewable Energy | Also tagged | Comments closed

2013 Texas Air Quality: Year In Review

Elena CraftAs we come to the end of another year, we look back on the progress that has been made to improve Texas’ air quality. Our work is especially important in Texas. Ozone pollution in the state’s largest cities routinely spikes above healthy levels, and Texas leads the nation in annual carbon emissions.

Throughout 2013, my fellow bloggers and I tracked the critical progress made towards cleaner air in Texas. Texas experienced a handful of victories and a handful of losses. To summarize the year, I’ll discuss a few of the areas where we made progress, and a few of the areas where there is still more work to do.

Progress Toward Smart Power and Clean Air

Over the past year, Texas wind power continued its promising positive trend, thanks in part to the state’s forward-looking decision to build new high-capacity electricity transmission lines linking the windy plains of West Texas with the state’s cities. The Competitive Renewable Energy Zone (CREZ) transmission project was approved by the state in 2008, and the new power lines are set to come online in a few weeks. The new power lines can carry 18,500 megawatts of electricity—enough to power millions of homes. The CREZ lines will help ensure Texas wind energy continues to expand, offsetting electricity produced from fossil-fuel power plants and reducing pollution. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Car Standards, Climate Change, Dallas Fort-Worth, Environmental Protection Agency, Houston, Ozone, Renewable Energy, Wind | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

Ozone Season Is Over, but the Fight for Clean Air in Texas Isn’t

Elena CraftOctober 31 marked the official end of ozone season in Texas. Ozone pollution, commonly known as smog, forms when compounds found in fossil fuel emissions react with sunlight. Ozone is a serious health concern for Texans, as excess exposure to ozone has been linked to a number of detrimental health effects, including asthma, heart attacks and even cancer.

Unfortunately, for many Texas cities, the combination of sunny days and crowded highways led to consistent violations of the standard over the course of this ozone season, and on a few days outside the season.

This year’s air quality measurements from the Houston region demonstrate that ozone pollution surpassed EPA’s health-based standard during 24 separate 8-hour intervals in 2013. Last year, the same air monitoring stations recorded 37 ozone violation days. Houston saw the highest ozone levels across the state, but Dallas and San Antonio followed closely behind. The worst days for both Houston and Dallas came when ozone peaked at 100 ppb—a level considered unsafe for healthy children and adults to have prolonged outdoor activities. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Air Act, Environmental Protection Agency, Ozone | Also tagged , | Comments closed

Bigger Is Better: Texas-Size Benefits From Tier 3

Last week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collected final comments on the proposed Tier 3 vehicle emission and fuel standards. EPA is expected to finalize the standards by the end of the year, enabling automakers to gear up to meet the standards. The anticipated standards, which go into effect in 2017, will reduce the amount of sulfur in U.S. gasoline and tighten emission controls on new passenger vehicles going forward.

These standards will reduce the amount of sulfur in U.S. gasoline and tighten emission controls on new passenger vehicles going forward. With over 19 million cars and trucks on the road, Texas stands to benefit a great deal from the new vehicle regulations.

The American Lung Association’s (ALA’s) 2013 State of the Air report revealed the grim state of air quality in the Lone Star State, placing both Houston and Dallas in the top 10 most ozone-polluted cities in the country. In total, 15 Texas counties received a grade of “F” for ozone pollution. Despite these findings, we believe that Texas has the potential to reduce air pollution throughout the state, and that the EPA’s proposed Tier 3 vehicle emission rules will help.

The ALA’s primary recommendation to address excessive air pollution comes in the form of new regulations on vehicle tailpipe emissions. Unlike power plants and larger industrial facilities, tailpipes release their emissions at ground level in densely populated areas. Thus, busy roadways are an especially hazardous source of air pollution. Many roadways stand as a round-the-clock source of nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide and particulate matter. This puts those who live or work near highways and expressways at greater risk. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Car Standards, Environmental Protection Agency, Houston | Tagged | Comments closed
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    Ramon AlvarezRamon Alvarez
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