Selected tags: Cross State Air Pollution Rule

Supreme Court Victory Brings Clean Air to Texas despite Challenges from State

Source: eoearth.org

Source: eoearth.org

Today marks the second in a series of clean air court victories that are nothing less than triumphant for air quality and health in Texas. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today in favor of Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR), a clean air standard that will protect the health of Americans across 28 Eastern states, including Texas, from the harmful air pollution emitted by distant power plants that moves across state borders. For Texas, the nation’s number one emitter of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and the number two emitter of sulfur dioxide (SO2), these vital clean air protections will safeguard the health of our children and elderly and revoke the coal industry’s free license to pollute without limitation, shielding neighboring states from lethal particulate matter and smog-forming pollution. Not to mention, today’s decision (once again) proves that Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott’s crusade to dismantle EPA’s common sense standards is fruitless, wastes taxpayer’s dollars, and jeopardizes the public health of all  Texans.

Much like the life-saving Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), upheld earlier this month by the U.S. Court of Appeals, CSAPR will reduce sulfur dioxide levels from power plants in eastern power plants by 73% and nitrogen oxide levels by 54% from 2005 levels. The emissions reductions from CSAPR alone will save up to 1,704 lives in Texas and provide the state with $5.8 to $14 billion annually in health benefits starting in 2014. Despite these substantial health benefits, the State of Texas challenged the rule to prevent a handful of coal plants from switching to low-sulfur coal, increasing scrubber efficiency, or installing readily-available pollution-control technology. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Air Act, Coal, Environmental Protection Agency| Also tagged , | Comments closed

Why Doesn’t Texas Want Clean Air?

Source: EPA

Source: EPA

Para un breve resumen de la crítica de Texas contra CSAPR en español, haga clic aquí.

Today the U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit heard arguments over two critically important clean air protections – the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule and the Standards for Mercury and Air Toxics. Texas has fought tooth and nail against both of these major pollution protections – protections that together have been estimated to prevent up to 45,000 deaths, 19,700 heart attacks and 530,000 asthma attacks.

Why are These Rules Important to Texas?

Air pollution from Texas' coal plants is, like many things in Texas, giant sized. Texas power plants collectively are the nation’s largest emitter of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and the second largest emitter of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Both pollutants are components of smog and are harmful to human health.

The Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSPAR), which applies to the eastern U.S, is of particular interest to Texas, not only because it helps control emissions within the state, but also because it helps protect the state from air pollution blowing in from neighboring states. CSAPR provides for upwind states to be good neighbors and protect downwind communities from harmful particulate matter and smog-forming pollution discharged from power plant smokestacks. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Air Act, En Español, Environmental Protection Agency, GHGs, MATS, Ozone, TCEQ| Also tagged , | Comments closed

Ozone Season Is Over, but the Fight for Clean Air in Texas Isn’t

Elena CraftOctober 31 marked the official end of ozone season in Texas. Ozone pollution, commonly known as smog, forms when compounds found in fossil fuel emissions react with sunlight. Ozone is a serious health concern for Texans, as excess exposure to ozone has been linked to a number of detrimental health effects, including asthma, heart attacks and even cancer.

Unfortunately, for many Texas cities, the combination of sunny days and crowded highways led to consistent violations of the standard over the course of this ozone season, and on a few days outside the season.

This year’s air quality measurements from the Houston region demonstrate that ozone pollution surpassed EPA’s health-based standard during 24 separate 8-hour intervals in 2013. Last year, the same air monitoring stations recorded 37 ozone violation days. Houston saw the highest ozone levels across the state, but Dallas and San Antonio followed closely behind. The worst days for both Houston and Dallas came when ozone peaked at 100 ppb—a level considered unsafe for healthy children and adults to have prolonged outdoor activities. Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Clean Air Act, Environmental Protection Agency, Ozone| Also tagged , | Comments closed
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