New Collaborative Efforts to Help Clean Up Port Pollution

EDF Staffers Marcia Aronoff (from left), Mark MacLeod, and Elena Craft (far right), join Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, at today's SmartWay press conference in South Carolina.

Today’s press conference in Charleston, S.C., marked another successful milestone toward reducing trucking emissions and improving local health in and around our nation’s ports.

Together with the Coalition for Responsible Transportation, Environmental Defense Fund and the Port of Charleston announced an agreement today to join forces with the Environmental Protection Agency on a new goods movement initiative called the U.S. EPA SmartWay Drayage Program. This program builds a partnership between the retail industry and the trucking and port communities, among other stakeholders, to solve a critical health and environmental challenge: how to reduce harmful air emissions from port trucks.

Dray trucks, typically older and more polluting than long-haul trucks, operate in and around port areas and represent one of the largest sources of port diesel emissions. Consequently, EDF appreciates EPA’s significant efforts in developing tools and funding opportunities that will help secure better environmental performance of trucks that operate at these ports.

We also appreciate the strong leadership from our nation’s top retailers in committing to hire trucks that meet specific environmental performance standards. In a statement released today, Target’s Director of Import Operations and President of the CRT said, “This partnership will generate private sector investment in clean technology, improve the environmental quality of our nation’s port communities and demonstrate the commitment we have made as the shipping industry’s leaders to emissions reductions.”

As you’ve read on this blog before, EDF has been working with CRT for some time now on a “clean trucks initiative” building a partnership between the retail industry and trucking and port communities. Such collaboration, often including port authorities, truck owners, retailers, local agencies and more, is cropping up at ports across the U.S. helping drivers meet new requirements.

The launch of a similar effort was just made today in Maryland, for example. The University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association have created the Mid-Atlantic Dray Truck Replacement Program, which will offer financial support to replace trucks serving the Ports of Baltimore, Virginia, Philadelphia and Wilmington.

Complex issues require collaborative solutions. As the hazards of air pollution and the effects that air pollutants on human health become more evident, creative partnerships are necessary to solve the most difficult environmental challenges like port truck emissions.

The real victory in such partnerships is the immediate and lasting health benefits for the people who live in and around U.S. ports. Fewer deaths, fewer asthma attacks, fewer lost workdays and schooldays, and reduced health care costs are just a few of the rewards that we can look forward to as a result of our collective efforts.

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