Texas Clean Air Matters

What Texas’ Elected Officials Should Know About House Bill 40

HB40

The Texas Senate is poised to vote on House Bill 40, new legislation that threatens to gut municipal rules and oversight of oil and gas drilling. The bill, an over-the-top reaction to the Denton fracking ban, stacks the deck in favor of industry and if passed, will undo almost 100 years of local home-rule authority.

That’s a big problem for Texas cities, especially since there seems to be broad misconception about what HB 40 does and doesn’t do. Despite what supporters are saying, this is not a “narrowly tailored” bill, but instead, a complete restructuring of Texas government that will drastically impact a city’s ability to protect the health, public safety and property of Texans who live in areas with heavy drilling activity.

Here are the facts: Read More »

Posted in Legislation, Natural gas| Leave a comment

A Legislative Push to Get Texas Serious About Demand Response

By: Suzanne L. Bertin, Director of Regulatory Affairs at EnerNOC

rp_engineer_with_controls_378x235.jpgWith the blooming Texas bluebonnets signalling the end of winter and at least a few weeks before the blazing heat begins, spring might not seem the ideal time for the Texas Legislature to debate laws about keeping the lights on or electric grid reliability.

But with a history of extreme temperatures, a booming population and economy, and new federal clean air rules coming into effect, now is the time for the Texas Legislature to take a strong policy stance in favor of demand response, an energy management program too long neglected as part of Texas’ comprehensive energy portfolio. Simply put, demand response is an innovative tool that rewards people who use less electricity during times of peak, or high, energy demand. In effect, demand response relies on people and technology, not power plants, to meet the need for electricity. But energy market rules prevent demand response from reaching its potential in Texas, because they fail to fully recognize its value and pose barriers to its providing energy and reliability services.

Advanced Energy Management Alliance (AEMA) – a coalition which includes demand response providers, end-user customers, suppliers, and affiliated businesses operating in Texas – is joining with the Environmental Defense Fund to support bills that would expand the deployment of demand response in Texas and eliminate constraints that impede its growth. Read More »

Posted in Demand Response, Legislation| Tagged | 1 Response

Like Everything Else in Texas, Earth Day Celebrations are BIG!

Source: flickr/jarche

Source: flickr/jarche

This coming Wednesday will be the 45th annual Earth Day, and its growth over the years has been nothing short of remarkable. It started as a 20 million person demonstration across America in 1970. And it is now the largest civic event in the world, with more than one billion participants in 192 countries.

In Texas, there will be a multitude of Earth Day events celebrating our green planet. Since Earth Day lands on a Wednesday, some events will happen before Earth Day and others will occur the following weekend. Here are a few events happening in central Texas:

Austin: The Capital of Texas is once again putting on its annual Austin Earth Day Festival, Saturday, April 18th from noon to 6pm at the Historic Browning Hanger. This event is free to the public and complete with drumming activities, an opportunity to hear major environmental figures speak, a Kid Zone, a chance to recycle your E-waste, and so much more. Austin Earth Day Festival is also a committed zero waste event.

There is another family friendly, Earth Day Fair in Austin at the Wildflower Church on Sunday afternoon, April 19. There will be tables by organizations like Save Our Springs, Faith Community Garden, Tecolote Farm, and more with information on a wide range of green topics. Activities for children and free food will  be available.  Read More »

Posted in Uncategorized| Tagged | Leave a comment

WANTED: Gang of Texas Legislators on the Loose at the Capitol Upending Local Control and Putting Texas in Harm’s Way

There is an assault on public health and environmental integrity underway in the Texas Legislature right now that’s the worst I’ve seen in my twenty-something years as an environmental advocate.

The Texas Legislature is currently considering a series of bills that would eliminate much of the important rules protecting not just air and water, but also public health and safety. Many of these laws have been in place for decades and are critical in a state where the energy industry and large polluting companies are a key part of our economy.

Here’s a run-down of some of the worst bills being considered at the Texas Legislature and the elected “leaders” sponsoring them: Read More »

Posted in Air Pollution, Climate Change, Energy Efficiency, Legislation, Renewable Energy, Wind| Tagged | 1 Response

Learn for Yourself about the Power of a Connected Home + Event Invitation

It wasn't long after my husband connected our first smart home device, a Nest Learning Thermostat, that I noticed a change.

Each time he walked by this new gadget, he would stop and do a little dance. He was interacting with this new friend, and it was a purely emotional response. He even insisted we repaint our wall to better showcase the Nest Thermostat, though he never suggested that for our artwork. Not only was our home connected, but now our hearts were in it.

This was no ordinary smart device. The Nest Thermostat gave us a sense of power, control, and freedom. And it said “hi” to us with its shining light as we approached. The best thing was the money we were saving by lowering our electricity bill, because we could now make sense of how we were using our air conditioning. This also helped reduce our carbon footprint. Read More »

Posted in Smart Grid| Tagged , | Read 1 Response

In the Face of Extreme Drought, Australia (and possibly Texas) Undoes Best Strategy for Water Conservation: Clean Energy

Source: flickr/katsrcool

Source: flickr/katsrcool

Cowboys, frontier grit, accented English, and wild, wide open spaces are just a few of the similarities shared by Texas and Australia. Both places also have an energy-water problem. But, the good news for Texas is that it’s not too late for us to learn from Australia’s mistakes – and a few successes, too.

In July 2014, Australia abandoned its carbon price, which gave Australia, a country with one of the highest per capita emissions of any developed country in the world and uses even more coal than the United States, the largest carbon-price system in the world outside of the European Union. (That is, until California’s program took effect in January 2013—California has the first-ever economy-wide carbon market in North America, potentially linking to other sub-national, national and regional markets around the world.) Since then, the Australian government has been in talks to significantly scale back its renewable energy target (RET), and the months-long squabbling without resolution is threatening the country’s renewable energy sector.

Texas, whose drought started in October 2010, is now in its worst drought on record. And some Texas leaders are taking a similar, short-sighted path as Australia when it comes to rolling back successful clean energy initiatives – ones that could also save scarce water supplies. Currently in the midst of its biennial legislative session, Texas is considering bills that would scrap the state’s successful wind renewable portfolio standard and prevent the state from complying with the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan (CPP), which establishes the nation’s first-ever limits on carbon pollution. Read More »

Posted in Climate Change, Drought, Energy-Water Nexus, Renewable Energy| Read 1 Response
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    Christina WolfeChristina Wolfe
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