New Ad Shows Broad Support for a Climate Bill

Thumbnail image of the ad showing broad support for climate change

Click the image for a larger view of the ad.

Anyone who doubts that climate legislation has broad-based support should take a close look at a new ad that's running in the Wall Street Journal and Politico.

88 groups put their names — and logos — on the line to call for a bipartisan energy bill.

EDF is a participant of course, along with other environmental groups like NRDC and the Pew Center. But some of the others may surprise you: the Christian Coalition, Michelin, Campbell's, the AFL-CIO,  Toyota, Owens Corning, Whirlpool.

The message from all of them:

We believe it's time for Democrats and Republicans to unite behind bi-partisan, national energy and climate legislation that increases our security and limits emissions, as it preserves and creates jobs. It's a question of American leadership.

If you don't have a paper handy, take a closer look at the large and diverse group of clean energy champions here.

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7 Comments

  1. Sue McCallister
    Posted January 23, 2010 at 10:34 pm | Permalink

    You cannot force people to adopt technology that does not exist. Of course all these players are signing on but strictly for PR purposes.

    No one signed on to using petroleum instead of whale oil because they wanted to save the whales. They adopted petroleum because IT WAS BETTER! No one can legislate a move away from carbon based fuel sources with no viable alternatives!! 80% of all energy is generated from carbon based sources. All the wishful thinking in the world cannot change that. Any solution has be to adoptable by China and India. Any lack of acknowledgement of that is delusion, IMHO.

  2. Posted January 24, 2010 at 8:27 am | Permalink

    Cleantech is different from Greenwashing. We need more entrepreneurs moving into this area and more jobs to be created. See this UNEP report from an Greentech conference thsi week. http://www.spirofrog.de/blog/2010/01/global-green-new-deal-cleantech-will-create-jobs/

  3. Honor Vallor
    Posted January 25, 2010 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

    I agree with Sue McAllister's reference to the "PR" expediency factor re polluting conglomerates such as Mobil. However, there ARE alternative renewable energy sources. The impeding factor is that the utilities companies expect taxpayers to fund broad spectrum research and development. This is contrived to [1] inhibit further availability of wind and solar energy collection and distribution and [2] enhance interest and support for multimillion-dollar funding for new nuclear energy installations.

  4. rainer
    Posted January 25, 2010 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

    The problem is not whether China or India will adopt to them. China is already heavily investing to claim leadership in this space and is about to leave the US behind in the dust on this crucial next wave of innovation. News like this comes out almost every month, not only on Solar but also Wind and Hydroenergy.
    http://www.solarfeeds.com/kelvin-schulle/7489-massive-solar-projects-makes-china-a-major-player.html
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/09/business/energy-environment/09solar.html
    China, Brasil and India can and will shift quickly towards those new technologies as they are less invested in the backward looking status quo and don't have control over much fossil fuels themselves.
    All it needs to unleash the innovation and potential of a variety of alternative energy technologies in the US is to stop subsidizing established corporation (e.g. oil refineries don't pay for the electricity they require in the process which would propel an EV (electric vehicle) further than the resulting gasoline.
    Level the playing field and we'll see a massive change in the energy landscape. Easier said and done though considering that the US in a democracy only on paper but truly controlled by big money and lobbyist on both sides of the aisle.

  5. Posted January 25, 2010 at 5:35 pm | Permalink

    Meanwhile, Germany is surging ahead with solar tech. Google it. Clean energy, renewable is ours to be had. Getting alternatives to oil is no great mystery, no revelation. It's science, putting the time and money into research. The US was doing that back in the 1970's. We actually began to think of having an (gasp!) energy plan. Look back — it's true. Congress was passing studied legislation and the people (as now) broadly favored it. Then came oil, SUV's, the lavish engineering of PR paid for by OIL. That's the simple truth. Which really will set you free if you stop listening to the Heritage Foundation, Rupert Murdoch, the Fellowship / Family (holy!) of Inhofe and the science ignorant flatland shrills.

    Stop subsidizing oil and put that money to use rewarding companies that use and develop alternatives. Put it towards updating the grid. Things that give people jobs, people who will use that money in turn to buy goods rather than sock it away in taxbreaks and Wall Street casinos. The flow of real things that will recover the economy.

  6. Posted January 26, 2010 at 7:56 am | Permalink

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